Corporate Jet-Setting Trash & No Star

Corporate Jet-Setting Trash & No Star




Wormhole Actualization Machinevia

bravecadet:

Wormhole Actualization Machine
via

bravecadet:

(via lefuckinsoleil)



Haikuesday, July 15, 2014

letters in cursive

twinges of what could have been

fog hugging the pond




This material is so black your brain cannot comprehend it.

popmech:

This material is so black your brain cannot comprehend it.

popmech:



Sunday Morning Cultural Studies

Sunday Morning Cultural Studies



BLOBFEST #PXV #partyonmyroof

BLOBFEST #PXV #partyonmyroof



Haikuesday, July 8th, 2014

my shoulders, rubbed deep
nails pianoed down my spine
your breath on my neck



the sun tastes metallic, too

the sun tastes metallic, too



Not bad tonight…

Not bad tonight…



Arnaud Lajeunie:“Water meets colour, colour meets water”

In his dramatic series Water meets colour, colour meets water, Paris-based photographer Arnaud Lajeunie captures striking images of ocean waves swirling with vibrant colors. Using sugar-based dyes, Arnaud stages artificial interventions in nature by tinting the surging water with a multitude of bright hues like acid green and deep indigo, creating visually startling scenes that depart from the traditional landscape.

asylum-art:

(via heylightandnight)




Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:



Self-taught artist Ben Young creates stunning sculptures of ocean waves and watery landscapes by carefully layering multiple sheets of hand-cut glass.

mymodernmet:

(via bruxistential)



Table Topography: Wood Furniture Embedded with Glass Rivers and Lakes by Greg Klassen

itscolossal:

(via workman)



Pinuccio Sciola

likeafieldmouse:

(via reekloose)



Porcelain Figures series by photographer Martin Klimas

From a height of three meters, porcelain figurines are dropped on the ground, and the sound they make when they hit trips the shutter release. The result: razor-sharp images of disturbing beauty—temporary sculptures made visible to the human eye by high-speed photography technology. The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces the static pose. In contrast to the inertness of the intact kitsch figurines Klimas started out with, the photographs of their destruction possess a powerfully narrative character.” (text from martin-klimas.de)

Pictures from Juxtapoz Magazine

Posted to Cross Connect by Miyuki

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